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How the Red Sox might have changed the health care system

By January 20, 2010

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The NFL might get higher TV ratings, but there are instances in which baseball still shows it's the national pastime.

The political world is abuzz after a Republican upset in the special election for the U.S. Senate in Massachusetts. And one of the big reasons Democrat Martha Coakley lost to Scott Brown is because she showed she was out of touch with baseball fans.

How do you make that leap? First, Brown was shown on video shaking hands outside Fenway Park on Jan. 1. When asked about her campaign strategy of staying low-key, Coakley said: "As opposed to standing outside Fenway Park? In the cold? Shaking hands?''

That got the attention of former Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling, who came out for Brown and against Coakley in his blog. No surprise there - Schilling is an outspoken conservative. Coakley took the bait and labeled Schilling a Yankees fan in an interview.

If there's one thing Schilling isn't, it's a Yankees fan. (The title of Schilling's post: "I've been called a lot of things..."). Schilling is still revered in Massachusetts for pitching hurt in the 2004 playoffs, and he used the spotlight to campaign for Brown.

As much as Brown's victory is seen as a national movement, politics are always local, as the saying goes. The Red Sox sell out every game at Fenway Park and get huge TV ratings. They're as New England as clam chowder. And Coakley painted herself as out of touch by not knowing who Curt Schilling was. Said Schilling at a Brown rally over the weekend:

"It does reflect on an elected official's relationship with her constituents. I don't think that somebody who's lived here their whole life, not understanding the importance of the prominence of the sports teams in this city, it's a big deal to people. I think it's another sign of her aloofness, and just the fact that she's very out of touch, I think, with the people."

Coakley lost, the Democrats' health care plan is wavering because of it, and it indirectly was caused by ... the Boston Red Sox.

Comments

January 20, 2010 at 2:21 pm
(1) Sarah E says:

Thanks for covering the story! I’ve shared this with many of my friends and have never been more grateful for the Boston Red Sox or Curt Schilling.

I think I may go out and buy and Red Sox hat now!

January 20, 2010 at 7:22 pm
(2) Joy says:

aren’t you all proud of yourself’s. I thought you where a baseball team. If Schill wants to get involved in politics, man up. You invited Teddy to throw out the first pitch last year, what was that about? I can’t figure out what the Sox’s got out this whole crap show, except loosing me as a fan. Stick to baseball.

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